Char Kway Teow (Southeast Asian)


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Reputed to be a sinful dish, this packed with high saturated fat content Char Kway Teow is a must try when you are in Singapore. In the earlier days when it was invented, mainly labourers are eating it as it was a cheap source of nutrients and energy. Since it was sold by farmers and fishermen and cockle gatherers, this dish consists of deshelled cockles, prawn, fishcake, Chinese sausage, stir-fried egg, pork fat sometimes crisp croutons of pork lard. The toppings are chopped Chinese chives. If you like spicy, a dash of chilli belachan is added to give it some kick (heat) and neutralizes by the juicy flavours of bean sprouts.

There is a little food fight over the origination of great national favourites like this one. I believe there are Malaysian friends arguing that these delicious local foods are their invention too. And since historically we know that Singapore was independent since 7 August 1965, those days when our early Chinese immigrants arrived, it is highly possible that these great foods are invented in the region – Singapore and Malaysia – at that time. Nonetheless, the recipe evolved to suit each regions preferences and tastes. It is quite pointless to claim now about its origination, other than raking up the past separation and disputes. So let's call Char Kway Teow a 'Southeast-Asian' hot favourite.




Zannnie

Deelish Recipes explore interesting food recipes appreciated by people in our modern society. From a first-person perspective on her experiences dining in her favourite restaurants, to homemade uniquely developed recipes, to interesting and creative cookbooks, Zannnie is giving you best and exciting recommendations for what you should explore next in this ever-evolving culinary world.

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